on the A719, south of Dunure, not far from Ayr, Scotland, between Drumshrang and Knoweside.

This weird phenomenon, which has long since amused the general public has been generally accepted by scientists to be an optical illusion.

The inland end of this stretch of road is actually 17 feet higher than the coastal end, but because of the unusual sloping landscape it appears that “up” is actually “down” and “down” “up”.

However, after many decades of following the ley lines across Scotland on foot and research, I have found one incontroversial fact that will surprise scientists - there are FOUR volcanic plugs and one basalt intrusion in line with this length of road.

Ley lines are lines of ancient and sacred sites across the planet, but the most important are placed between two or more volcanic plugs -  see Home Page at top for more information:

Notice that the length of the “Electric Brae” (300 yards at this angle) is very similar to Edinburgh Castle (306 yards) and the splinter plug of Calton Hill (400 yards).

Using my divining rods to measure the energies which flow across and down this strange road, I discovered that above and below this effect, following down the road, the vertical waves are 4 metres wavelength, 5 amplitude, while on the “Electric Brae” itself the waves were much closer, (more energy input) at  3m wavelength, similar amplitude.

A normal road is about 5 metres.

I do remember reading, many years ago, that this effect was never noticed until the road was tarmaced.




It is obvious that the energy is coming from Ailsa Craig, (below) which can be seen in the distance:

Now I will leave it to the scientists and physicists to examine this curious phenomena and find out how these natural waves of energy from all of these plugs can interact with us to cause this effect.

Return to Home Page

.

.

Geopathic Stress Demonic Attack Poltergeist "Ley Lines and Earth Energies" book Dowsing Cup marks "Ley Lines of the UK and the USA"" book Home Page

The “Electric Brae”

a

Gravity Hill?

The electric Brae

Picture courtesy of “Discover Scotland”

Ailsa Craig, volcanic plug The Electric Brae, with four volcanic plugs in line