Strathearn has been the site of quite exceptional esoteric knowledge for over 5,000 years. The cursus on Broich Road, thought to have been a ceremonial pathway, for instance, has been dated to 4,460 years old, and the nearby Stayt of Crieff, originally a Neolithic burial mound, about the same time.

I discovered that our ancestors have been using the natural energies from the Highland Boundary Fault which runs between Crieff and Comrie to power their standing stones and circles, and, over the next few thousand years, built several remarkable infrastructures of energy upon which their burial grounds, churches, castles and other sacred sites were based,

Standing stones and circles, which are so common in this area, were carefully placed over geological faults, the natural energies they emit rising vertically to the surface into a standing stone, which, acting like a prism, sends a                stream of energy through a distant burial ground, for instance.

I also discovered that Crieff’s main streets, King Street and Burrell Street, collectively shaped like a right angled triangle, take their energies from the volcanic plugs upon which the castles of Stirling and Dumbarton sit, while West High Street is aligned with a four stone circle on top of a volcanic pluton at Braefordie near Comrie. The town has been built by the masons, who, after constructing Drummond Castle on top of a volcanic dyke running a short distance parallel to the dyke of  Bennybeg, designed the town geomantically as a six pointed star. The road to Drummond Castle sits on top of that volcanic dyke along with the chapels and burial grounds of Innerpeffray and Strageath to the East, with the complex of standing stones at Dunruchin Hill, near Comrie, to the West.

I was later astonished to discover that ALL of the straight streets in and around Crieff have been carefully aligned with ancient sites. The long straight road between Crieff and Muthill, for instance, can be projected to its energy source, Clach na Tiompan, (the stone of the drum), four stone circle near Auchnafree in Glen Almond, passing through Ochtertyre Mausoleum (built on top of the Highland Boundary fault) and the Druids Cave. This cave is comprised of six huge boulders which have long been thought to have been glacial erratics, carried to their resting place by ancient glaciers, but have in reality been placed there at enormous effort by our brilliant and energetic ancestors. This will be explained later.



A few other “ancient straight track” roads are Ferntower road aligned to Monzie kerbed cairn with its small  cist containing the cremated remains of a woman and small child; Coldwells road to Drummond Castle; the road leading to Ochtertyre Mausoleum from the standing stone at Concraig Farm, near Muthill; Drummond Terrace and ????? aligned with Cluggy Castle at Ochtertyre: ?????; to the Cradle Stone on the Knock, another large boulder which was thought to have been a glacial erratic but is much more likely to have been considered a fertility site as a girl at one time could put her ear to the stone and if she could hear a baby crying she knew that she would be married and have children.

Pittenzie Road leading down from the new school is believed by archaeologist to have been built on top of the 4,460 bp cursus recently discovered, which is also aligned with Monzie Castle, but Broich Road is even more interesting. On the South side of this road, close to the cursus, is the site of an ancient Neolithic burial chamber, later used as a Justiciary Court. Centuries later, on top of this mound the Earls would dispense justice, and for example if a cattle reiver was sentenced to death he would be taken from the court a few yards to Broich Road and carried along that straight road to the “Kind Gallows” which he could see in a dead straight line a few hundred yards away, knowing full well that further along this line was, presumably, the original cemetery.

This cemetery was to be later constructed hosting the water fountain with its three ibis birds, depicting the Egyptian God Trismegistus in the centre of 12 radiating kerbs containing the remains of notable Crieffites, like McAra, Porteous, and Daniel Robertson, Dalnaglar, the first and foremost president of the national Bank of England (the bankers of Scotland were so highly respected that they were head hunted from England). At the entrance to this circle is the twin pillars of the Masonic triptych, its purpose to accurately tell the solstices and equinoxes.

Comrie is a perfect example (left of Illustration 3),with its main street in line with The Giant’s Grave in the Sma’ Glen, and other straight stretches of the A85 are in line with, for instance, the largest standing stone on Dunruchin Moor. This complex of five standing stones on Dunruchin Hill is just part of a wide line of these menhirs, taking their energy from Clach na tiompan some 12 miles to the North East. The prostate standing stone at Foulford Inn, the Milton and Lawers burial grounds, Queens Road to the standing stone at Lawers;   with Dalginross road and Strowan road in line with standing stones on Dunruchin Hill:

More surprises were to come, however: following decades of hill walking and researching the ley line system, he was also puzzled by the Pow streams - straight lines of irrigation ditches built by the Monks in the 13th century and later finished by Robert the Bruce. Here again was a zig zag system of waterways, designed ostensibly to drain the low lying farmland between Crieff and Methven. To his astonishment, when he projected these ditches he found that they, also, were connected to ancient sites, mainly to the Stayt of Crieff, the Neolithic burial ground on Crieff’s Broich Road, later the Justiciary court, but now leveled.  The other Neolithic chamber at Rottenreoch on the low Comrie Road is also aligned with the Pow streams.

Standing stones, burial grounds, chapels were all aligned, with the “Cradle Stone” on the Knock obviously in line with the straight stretch of the Pow as it entered the river Earn. Crossroads, like the ones on the Highlandman Loan road are also a feature (crossroads were special places where suicide victims were buried, as it was thought that the spirit of the unfortunate would be confused by the crossing energies of the four roads).

The Cradle Stone (diorite on top of conglomerate or pudding stone) is  one of a number of so-called glacial erratics scattered across Strathearn; Samson’s Stone 500 metres North of Sir David Baird’s monument (schistose grit on conglomerate) has no less than six leys running through it with sixteen ancient sites in lines.More surprises were to come, however: following decades of hill walking and researching the ley line system, he was also puzzled by the Pow streams - straight lines of irrigation ditches built by the Monks in the 13th century and later finished by Robert the Bruce. Here again was a zig zag system of waterways, designed ostensibly to drain the low lying farmland between Crieff and Methven. To his astonishment, when he projected these ditches he found that they, also, were connected to ancient sites, mainly to the Stayt of Crieff, the Neolithic burial ground on Crieff’s Broich Road, later the Justiciary court, but now leveled.  The other Neolithic chamber at Rottenreoch on the low Comrie Road is also aligned with the Pow streams.

Standing stones, burial grounds, chapels were all aligned, with the “Cradle Stone” on the Knock obviously in line with the straight stretch of the Pow as it entered the river Earn. Crossroads, like the ones on the Highlandman Loan road are also a feature (crossroads were special places where suicide victims were buried, as it was thought that the spirit of the unfortunate would be confused by the crossing energies of the four roads).

The Cradle Stone (diorite on top of conglomerate or pudding stone) is  one of a number of so-called glacial erratics scattered across Strathearn; Samson’s Stone 500 metres North of Sir David Baird’s monument (schistose grit on conglomerate) has no less than six leys running through it with sixteen ancient sites in lines.

More surprises were to come, however: following decades of hill walking and researching the ley line system, I was also puzzled by the Pow streams - straight lines of irrigation ditches built by the Monks in the 13th century and later finished by Robert the Bruce. Here again was a zig zag system of waterways, designed ostensibly to drain the low lying farmland between Crieff and Methven. To my astonishment when I projected these ditches I found that they, also, were connected to ancient sites, mainly to the Stayt of Crieff, the Neolithic burial ground on Crieff’s Broich road, later the Justiciary court, but now leveled.

The other Neolithic chamber at Rottenreoch on the low Comrie road is also aligned with the Pow streams. Standing stones, burial grounds, chapels were all aligned, with the “Cradle Stone” on the Knock obviously in line with the straight stretch of the Pow as it enters the river Earn. Crossroads, like the ones on the Highlandman Loan road are also a feature (crossroads were special places where suicide victims were buried, as it was thought that the spirit of the unfortunate would be confused by the crossing energies of the four roads).

The Cradle Stone (diorite on top of conglomerate or pudding stone) is in a line of three roads in Crieff, and is one of a number of so-called glacial erratics scattered across Strathearn; Samson’s Stone 500 metres North of Sir David Baird’s monument (schistose grit on conglomerate) has no less than six leys running through it with sixteen ancient sites in lines and must have been a very important site at one time.

St. Fillans “Serpent” stone, often erroneously called “The Crocodile” (crocodiles are not indiginous to Scotland!) has three leys: the main one is a four stone circle in a St. Fillans garden to the Serpent and on to a four stone circle in a field near Twenty Shilling Wood to the West of Comrie, Comrie Parish Church/White Church and burial ground to Dalchirla standing stone and on to its four stone circle.

There is another ley from the Serpent to Kindrochet Neolithic burial cairn/Aberuchil burial ground/Craigneish standing stone on the Comrie to Braco road. The final ley is from the “Serpent” to the Milton burial ground and the standing stone at Lawers.

Bearing in mind that the Serpent would have been carved from the nearby rock face and must have been placed in a position with respect to the hill fort of Dundurn, it must have been a very visible “totem” to the people in the area, and its connection to Kindrochet burial cairn shows that it would have been there long before the Iron Age fort. It would make sense that the stone would have been painted in its entirity as a serpent or snake, as the energies running down all of these ancient sites are a form of natural electro-magnetic wave and weave from side to side which would make our ancestors worship any animal which moved in a similar sinuousoidal manner, like wurrams, snakes, salmon and trout.





































This complex of energies which our ancestors built is similar but more powerful than the Chinese system of feng shui with its conentations of ancestor worship and health benefits. Deeply spiritual, they believed that they could manipulate the spirits of their deceased ancestors for the benefit of themselves and family.

Nowadays, of course, few people believe in spirits, which is, no doubt, the reason why we have difficulty in understanding the mindset of those who built these remarkable systems. It seems that the straight roads in and around Crieff and its satellite villages were used to keep the occupants on “the straight and narrow” healthy energy, away from the spirit paths which is yet another system of energies.  Many years ago I discovered that all of the ancient burial grounds around Perthshire were placed in straight lines leading away, and probably returning, as these leys are actually circuits, from the volcanic plugs and castles of Stirling, Dumbarton and Ailsa Craig. These plugs radiate out energies like the spokes of a bicycle wheel, and where they cross, especially over a geological fault, were the best place to inter their dead. These “dead straight” spirit path were suspected of being a very unhealthy place to build a house.





























The Pow stream complex emitted from the remains of ancestors in the Neolithic chamber is a different form of energy, radiating out to Inchaffrey Abbey and its grounds. The monks must have used this for meditation and health benefits as well as healing the land around, similar again to Chinese feng shui.

It surprised me that the Pow streams were used as conduits of this form of energy as they are slow, and certainly nowadays polluted which alters the character of this energy. I have often found during my research that a healthy ley stream of waves passing over a polluted canal, stream, cesspit, rubbish dump, contaminated ground or building like an abattoir for instance, pick up the unhealthy characteristics and pass it on to any person or animal downstream. Likewise, an unhealthy ley line could be cleaned and energized by passing across a clear, tumbling mountain burn, waterfall or water fountain.

Crieff especially, looks like a black hole on my ley map, and I wonder what effect these strange energies have on the population. Standing stones and circles have long been known to demand respect from us, but have repeatedly been destroyed, often by farmers clearing their fields. On Crieff’s Dollerie Farm, for instance, bordering the Broich road and close to the Stayt, there used to be a standing stone which was removed by the farmer using, of all things, a small explosive charge. A few months later he died, swearing that it was his actions which had caused his demise as he had never had an illness in his life.

I have also discovered simple ways to amplify the energies from standing stones by a factor of around ten and hope to do some further work to further this knowledge, as this is the first time that the function of these ancient sites has been given to the general public, and since Crieff, Comrie and Muthill are exceptionally placed with reference to the Highland Boundary Fault and the Pow waters in Scotland as far as these energies go. The aspects of the health of the residents in the surrounding area with respect to these streams of energy cannot now be ignored, as recently archaeologists have discovered that Stonehenge was one of the major healing centres of the United Kingdom and perhaps Europe.

The subject of leys for decades has been the subject of scorn from most archaeologists and scientists, referring to researchers as “the  lunatic fringe”, but now any person with an Ordnance Survey map of Strathearn can verify their existence now that he or she knows what to look for.




Drummond Castle, near Crieff, Perthshire, Scotland.    Picture by Gavin Prime.

The Druid’s Cave or Shelter Stone, a key part of the ley line structure over much of Scotland.

Illustration 3. Leys emitted from standing stones and circles in Strathearn. Notice that the standing stones on Dunruchin Moor (bottom left) take theior energies from the Highland Boundary Fault. Drummond Castle its road and two burial grounds are also placed above that lava dyke.

The green line is from the Cradle Stone to the Pow stream, an irrigation ditch emptying into the River Earn.

Illustration 4. Clach na Tiompan, a four stone circle at Auchnafree, West Glen Almond.

Illustration 6. All of the straight roads in this town are aligned with ancient sites. Notice the black ley bottom centre, aligned with the Broich Road, the the “Kind” Gallows and cemetery.

Illustration 7. The “Cradle Stone”, where young girls could tell if they would be married and have children. It has been broken into two pieces.

Illustration 8. The water fountain, at the oldest part of the cemetery, with 12 kerbs radiating out from it containing the graves of respected members of the community.

Illustration 9. The Masonic Triptych in Crieff cemetery (top Photoshopped on) with fountain and twelve graves.

Illustration 10. Samson’s Stone, looking towards Comrie.

Illustration 11. Six ley streams through this large boulder - definitely not a glacial “erratic”.

Illustration 12. The Pow water, a series of straight irrigation ditches aligned with ancient sites.

Illustration 13. The Pow stream, (in blue) appears to take its energies from the Stayt of Crieff tomb.

Illustration 14. The leys through the important “serpent or Dragon” stone at St. Fillans.  The stone is actually pointing in a different direction to illustration and has a different form of energy running down its length, from a cup marked standing stone at Foulford Inn, near the Sma Glen.

Illustration 4. Small scale map of the leys through Crieff’s straight streets

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